Using a Kindle to help you edit


Hi guys,

This is going to be a fairly short blog post, but I really wanted to share something with you that I’m  finding super useful during my editing process. I participated in Campnanowrimo during July, which was awesome. Having dragged my third draft out for well over a year, nano forced me to write consistently every day (which I rarely do) and I’m now left with a finished story. 66,000 words later, it’s now time to edit, alter, expand, cut and tweak my draft until I’m happy it’s the best it can possibly be. No sweat, right?

Having used the notecard outline method previously, I’m happy with the actual plot of my story, hence my editing from now on will focus mainly on sub plots, characterisation, foreshadowing and dialogue. Although I know roughly what I intend to achieve during this draft, when editing, it can be hard to know exactly where to start and what to do. Personally, I like to write and edit chronologically as I see no point in writing and polishing a later chapter, only to find out it no longer fits with the rest of the novel. I therefore know I want to start editing from the beginning of the novel, but how exactly should I get started?

Well, there are many ways I could attack this draft. I could simply read it chronologically on screen and alter as I go or I could print it off as Becca has done. Although I do intend to print off my novel, I will not be reading it from the A4 printed sheets.

So, what will I be doing instead?

I have sent the Word document to my Kindle, and I’m reading it as I would read any other eBook.

And honestly, I can’t believe the difference it’s making to the reading process. For some reason, reading it in said format, makes it so much easier to spot the elements that need changing. The problems seem so much more obvious when reading on this device.

Once you’ve spotted the issues, you can make notes one of three ways. You can:

  • edit as you go, I.E, have the word document open at the same time and alter as you read.
  • edit directly on your Kindle using the ‘note’ feature and then refer back to these later when editing the Word document.
  • hand write any changes on a printed hard copy after first making them in the Kindle version.

I tend to use a mixture of the second and third option. The second option is good for when you’re on the go, and the third is perfect if you prefer hand written scribbles to on screen notes.

How do I get my document onto my Kindle?

This is the easy bit. Simply download the Send to Kindle App , set it up using the instructions and click and drag your document into the window. It will then appear on your Kindle. Easy as pie. I recommend sending it as a Word document as although you can send PDF’s, they appear in a fixed format on your device, so won’t look like proper eBooks, more like smaller versions of the A4 PDF (not ideal). If you work in Pages (Mac) like me, simply export your Pages doc as a Word doc using the export function (RTF may also work). I also fiddle about with making each new chapter start on a new page before I send to Kindle, to make it look even more like a real book, although this is more procrastination than anything else. (Note: If you want each of your chapters to start on a new page and your original document is in Pages, export it to Word before you play with the chapters, as your Word doc will look different to your Pages doc).

Once it appears on your Kindle you can then treat it like any other book – you can even adjust the text size and font as you would normally. All that’s left to do is read! Try and look at your novel with fresh eyes (hard, I know) and, as you go along, any bits of stilted dialogue, typos or bits that don’t make sense should jump out at you. When you find these areas to improve, note them down somewhere (as discussed earlier) and then apply your notes to your original document later. To use the Kindle note function, all you need do is press and hold down on the word and ‘note’ will pop up. You then use the Qwerty keypad to type your comments. You can even view all your notes at the end and export them into a document (see this link for more info).

And that’s it! Even if you don’t end up using this method to do your editing, it can just be nice to see your novel ‘in context’ as if it were a real, published book.

How do you usually edit? Comment below!

 

 

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