Editing and re-drafting – a checklist, part two


Hi guys, me again! Thanks so much for all your lovely comments RE part one of this blog post, it’s great to hear that our posts help not only us but others too, and we hope part two is as helpful and insightful as part one. Without further ado, let’s begin…

  1. Overworked descriptions and cliche metaphors

    I realise that overworked and cliche are two different things but keep an eye out for both, as they risk making your work look like the uninteresting ramblings of an amateur writer. To clarify:

    Overworked description

    “Hannah clumsily grabbed her red, ceramic, heavy mug and filled it to the brim with scalding, hot, brown coffee. It burnt her calloused, dry hands.”

    Although this sentence is not horrendous, it’s a little too descriptive. One or two adjectives would have sufficed. See below.

    “Hannah grabbed her mug and filled it to the brim with scalding coffee. It burnt her dry, calloused hands.”

    Much better!

     Source

     

    Cliche metaphors

    This one is self-explanatory but some examples of a cliche metaphor are:
    – His eyes shone like diamonds
    – Her rosy red cheeks
    – His deep, blue eyes

  2. Accidental or thinly veiled racism / sexism / homophobia etc.

    Sadly this is more common in novels than you may think. Of course, most of the time the author does not intend to offend, but it does happen. I have read a few reviews of a current popular novel where the readers felt that the only POC in the novel was represented badly (she was bitchy and homophobic with apparently no redeeming characteristics), so when creating characters, please be aware of the above.

  3. Representation

    Of course, only you, the writer, know your story world and its inhabitants, but it may be wise to consider whether or not your cast is representative of both ethnicity and gender, especially if it’s set in today’s modern world.

  4. Watch out for outlandish developments

    Every plot point and development needs to be a logical step up from what has happened before it. Even shocking plot twists or action scenes have a build up and have been ‘set up’ to some degree. Everything needs to be linked, or the result of something that precedes it, so try not to add in outlandish plot points just to ‘spice up’  your novel. I was recently reading (and enjoying) a novel where there was no mention of cannibals, until all of a sudden, just for a little bit of conflict, the protagonist was abducted and almost spit-roasted for dinner. It struck me as out of place, awfully random and to be honest,  a bit stupid. All events in your novel are stitched together, so keep your eyes peeled for any random scenes or pointless developments.

     Source

  5. Make sure your MC is actually participating in conversations

    This may sound stupid but keep an eye out for this especially if there are lots of characters. It’s all too easy to allow your protagonist to take a back seat and merely observe events and interactions. Make sure your MC is a driving force in the conversations – it’s easy (especially in first-person) to have the narrator pass thought or judgement on a situation in their head when it may be best if they were to make their judgment out loud to the other characters.

  6. Is your main character somewhat likeable?

    Don’t get me wrong flawed protagonists are great, but your readers must want to root for them, so they have to have something going for them, even if that thing is pure grit or ruthlessness in gaining the story goal. They don’t need to be perfect or even nice, but at a basic level check that they aren’t, even inadvertently unless intentional, any of the following: racist, sexist, unnecessarily bitchy, unfairly jealous, whiny or homophobic).

  7. Watch your use of nonsensical sentences

    Of course creatively writing is part of the fun, so go forth and use your imagination but read every sentence to make sure it does actually make sense. There’s no point trying too hard to be literary or whimsical if the meaning behind the sentence is lost to the reader.

     Source

  8. Watch out for deep yet pointless conversations

    A deep conversation is all well and good but if it randomly appears in your novel and doesn’t contribute to the overall goal or theme then cut it – it’s just fluff.

  9. Don’t make your antagonist flat

    No one is 100% evil, not even your villain. Evil for the sake of evil is something that comes up in a lot of negative book reviews, so make sure your book isn’t one of them. As well as this, don’t make your protagonist 100% good. No one likes a Mary Sue.

  10. Consistency throughout

    Another obvious point that is all too easy to overlook. Ensure consistency throughout. Some examples of things to look out for:

    – The weather – if it’s snowing one minute, chances are it’s not going to be boiling hot the next.
    – Character hair, eye colour, clothing or jewellery.
    – Where your characters are in relation to one another as well as if they are sitting or standing. Also, which characters are actually in the scene.
    – Time of day
    – Spellings of names, places and made up things.

    The above is just the start. There are so many things (most of which will be unique to your novel) which you will need to keep a check on. For example, in a scene in my novel my characters are wearing masks which cover their mouths. It would therefore, be a bit stupid if I forgot this and described a character’s smile (because how the heck would you know if he was smiling or not?!). FYI this totally happened, oops.

     Source

  11. Do your research

    If you’re representing a culture or a movement (think BDSM in 50 Shades) do your research so as not to offend those who are part of it. 50 Shades often has those involved in the BDSM movement complaining that it’s not accurate and is sexist etc. This also applies to different cultures – you don’t want to cause offence.

     Source

  12. Checking mechanics

    Your protagonist is hot-wiring a car? Check that the methods used are viable and correct (but don’t put your new-found knowledge to use!).

  13. Do you have too much inner monologue?

    This boils down to the whole show-don’t-tell thing (see part 1). If the protagonist is talking to himself summarising what’s happening, would it be better and more engrossing to the reader if it was changed to action or dialogue? The answer may be no but it’s worth checking just to be sure.

  14. Have you started in the correct place?

    If your novel only picks up pace in the last 75% (like several books I’ve read recently) then consider starting the novel later. You don’t want your readers to give up before the good bit, so why not move the good bit forward!

  15. Are your characters cardboard cut out or cliche?

    Is your novel populated with dumb blondes, geeky redheads who look gorgeous when they take off their glasses, handsome square-jawed football players or brooding dark-haired Byronic heroes? If yes, consider changing it up a bit. As well as this, make sure your characters are multi-faceted. Why not give your star football player an interest in sewing, or make the seemingly dumb blonde an owner of a multi-million dollar company? Use your imagination and inject some uniqueness and life into your world.

    And that’s it for now! Let me know what you think of the above in the comments!

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Editing and re-drafting – a checklist, part two

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s